More Photographs of Gau-Algesheim

My friends and former colleagues Barbara and Rene just returned from a trip to Germany.  Rene’s family lives not too far from Gau-Algesheim, and he and Barbara were kind enough to travel to my ancestral town and take some photographs.  Some of these have text that I need to get translated.  As I’ve observed from other photographs of this town, it appears to be a charming, small town with lots of character.  I think that Barbara and Rene have really captured that impression of the town.  Thanks so much, Rene and Barbara!

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[Ralph tells me that the sign lists the hours of the mayor of Gau-Algesheim.]

 

 

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[According to Ralph, this is a list of local businesses in Gau-Algesheim.]

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[Translation by Chip:

JACOB’S PILGRIMAGE

Pilgrim Hospitals

Pilgrim Hospitals, also called Hospices, were, in the Middle ages, the only place where destitute Pilgrims could find a bed for the night, a bowl of soup and care for their suffering. Often consisting of only a sleeping hall (large communal bedroom), the kitchen, a dining room, and a small chapel, as well as stalls and barn.

Many pilgrims often had to share the sleeping area, and follow very strict “Rules of the House.”

In cities, the hospices were often better equipped, or were part of a cloister. Here in Gau-Algesheim you have to imagine a rather meager hospital which, possibly, had to provide for the poor and sick of the place.

 

 

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[According to Chip, “The sign over the “1726” (from the photos, the sign appears to be in the Town Hall), loosely translated, means that Lothar Francis, the elected Archbishop, built (financed the reconstruction of)) the building.”]

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6 thoughts on “More Photographs of Gau-Algesheim

  1. Very interesting! The blue sign (Tafel) translates as:

    “JACOB’S PILGRIMAGE

    Pilgrim Hospitals

    Pilgrim Hospitals, also called Hospices, were, in the Middle ages, the only place where destitute Pilgrims could find a bed for the night, a bowl of soup and care for their suffering. Often consisting of only a sleeping hall (large communal bedroom), the kitchen, a dining room, and a small chapel, as well as stalls and barn.

    Many pilgrims often had to share the sleeping area, and follow very strict “Rules of the House.”

    In cities, the hospices were often better equipped, or were part of a cloister. Here in Gau-Algesheim you have to imagine a rather meager hospital which, possibly, had to provide for the poor and sick of the place.”

    The sign over the “1726” (from the photos, the sign appears to be in the Town Hall), loosely translated, means that Lothar Francis, the elected Archbishop, built (financed the reconstruction of)) the building.

    My German is quite rusty…it’s been so many years since I’ve used it…but it was fun to read it, and look at the photographs of the well-kept, pastel-colored buildings, so typical for both Bavaria, and Austria too. Very pretty. TONS of history (of course) in that area. But if you think that family genealogy can be confusing at times…try following the wildly complex/nuanced paths of the various minor ruling families (scores of them) of Europe. Lol, My eyes glaze over at the simple mention of just the Habsburgs… 🙂

    Like

    • Thank you so much, Chip! I will add the translation of the Jacob’s Pilgrimage photo and the 1726 to the site so that those who miss the comments can read it.

      Like

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