How did they meet?

Among the photos that Robin sent me last week are these pictures of her parents, Maurice and Lynn Goldschlager, taken in 1949.

Maurice and Lynn Goldschlager Camp Milford 1949

Maurice and Lynn Goldschlager Camp Milford 1949

It was labeled Camp Milford in Connecticut.  I asked Robin if

she knew what Camp Milford was, and she said she thought it was one of those camps for adults that existed back in those days.  I looked it up and found this advertisement and these postcards.

Camp_Milford_ad_1948On the Lake, Camp Milford Kent, CT

Maurice and Lynn did not meet at this camp, but met in New Jersey where my uncle was stationed for some time during World War II.  As Robin tells the story, “The story goes that my dad heard the clicking of her heels walking down the hall and he said to a buddy (before he even laid eyes on my mom) that’s the girl I’m going to marry. And they did.”  They were married soon after on June 10, 1945, with my uncle still in uniform.

My parents, however,  did meet at one of those camps, as did my aunt Elaine and her husband Phillip Lehrbaum. It was a popular way for young Jewish singles to meet back then—away from their parents, but under some kind of supervision.

My parents met at Log Tavern in Milford, Pennsylvania (not to be confused with Camp Milford in Connecticut).

Camp Log Tavern Milford, PA

Camp Log Tavern Milford, PA

log tavern from jodylog tavern softball postcard

My aunt and uncle met at Green Mansions in Warrensburg, New York, which became well-known for its theatrical and musical performances.

Ad for Green Mansions in a YMHA newsletter

Ad for Green Mansions in a YMHA newsletter

green mansions

Green Mansions

Green Mansions

Here’s an interview with someone discussing the history of Green Mansions:

It’s too bad these camps no longer exist; they seem like a great idea.  Maybe they were not as efficient as online dating, but at least you met someone face to face, not over bandwidth.  My husband Harvey and I did the next best thing: we met as camp counselors at a YM-YWHA day camp for kids when we were in college.

Thinking about this got me thinking about how my parents met, how my aunts and uncles met.  I am always intrigued by how couples meet.  The stories are usually sweet or funny or romantic or surprising.  They also take on a certain mythic quality.

Florence and John Cohen 1951

Florence and John Cohen 1951

Did my father really first see my mother across the dining room at Log Tavern where he was working as a waiter and immediately tell his friend that she was the girl he was going to marry?

According to another family legend, my Aunt Elaine met her husband when she mistook him for a different man she had met the day before at Green Mansions.  Apparently, my Uncle Phil was not scared off either by her unintentional forwardness or her mistake.  Here they are on their honeymoon visiting Fort Ticonderoga in 1941:

Elaine and Phil 1941

Elaine and Phil 1941

My grandfather Isadore supposedly saw my grandmother sitting in the window of her sister Tillie’s grocery store in Brooklyn and was taken by her beauty.

How did your parents meet? Your grandparents? How did you meet your significant other? If you are willing to share the stories, feel free to use the comment space below or email your stories to me, and I will add them to the blog.

Thank also to Jody for finding the pictures of her parents and the postcard of Log Tavern.  Here are some more of them at Green Mansions.

Elaine and Phil at Green Mansions

    Elaine and Phil at Green Mansions

 

lap photo green mansions
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