Women are VERY Difficult: Part III, Lizzie and Rachel

As I continue to look for my grandfather’s female first cousins, I have hit some more dead ends.  I hit a wall with Lillie after 1910.  With Sarah I got as far as 1940, and I still can track her children to learn more.  I have made lots of progress tracing the life of Rebecca Rosenzweig, but I am putting off reporting on my findings until I get some more confirmation.  But with Lizzie and Rachel, I’ve had almost no luck at all.   I have not been able to find anything that reveals if they got married and, if so, what their married names were.  With Lizzie, the trail runs out in 1920; with Rachel I can get no further than 1930.

Here is what I know about Lizzie.  She was born in February or March of 1900; I have not found a birth certificate, but her age on the 1900 census was three months, and the census was taken on June 7, 1900.

Gustave Rosenzweig and family 1900 census

Gustave Rosenzweig and family 1900 census

Perhaps no certificate was ever recorded for her, for none shows up in the NYC birth index.  She was living with her family in 1900, 1905, 1910, 1915, and in 1920.  In 1915 she was in high school, and in 1920 she was an operator in a shop that made underwear.

Gustave Rosenzweig family on the 1905 NYS census

Gustave Rosenzweig family on the 1905 NYS census

Gustave Rosenzweig and family 1910 census

Gustave Rosenzweig and family 1910 census

Rosenzweigs 1915

Rosenzweigs 1915

Rosenzweigs 1920 census

Rosenzweigs 1920 census

After that, she disappears.  She is not living with either her father or mother in 1925 or thereafter, nor is she living with any of her siblings.  I assume that she got married and changed her name, but I cannot find any record of a marriage in NYC or on Long Island.  Perhaps she was married elsewhere, but I have no idea where to start.

I thought I had a great clue from Gustave’s death certificate, which was signed by a daughter whose first name started with L, but as I posted the other day, the signature is hard to read and led me nowhere.  I even used the address on the death certificate, 59 Oak Street in Brooklyn, and searched the 1940 census for that address, but no one with her name was living at that address in 1940, which was four years before the date of her father’s death certificate.

Thus, I have nowhere else to turn, and for now I’ve hit a wall and have to stop hitting my head against it.  It hurts to give up, but as I learned in doing the research for the Brotman side, sometimes you have to stop and hope a new clue will appear.

I also know very little about Rachel. I do not have her birth certificate, but from the census reports it seems she was probably born in either 1902 or 1903. I cannot find a birth record for a Ray or Rachel Rosenzweig, however, in either of those years. There is one for 1900, but that is too early, and one in 1904, but that appears to be too late.  On the 1905 census report, her age was four, meaning that she was born in 1901, just a year after Lizzie; however,  in 1910 she was reported as being 7, making her birth year either 1902 or 1903.  In 1915, Rachel was reported to be 12, making her birth year again 1902 or 1903.  In 1920, she was seventeen, and although the entry is not very legible, it looks like she was working in a mail order business.  In 1925 she was 22 and employed as a stenographer, and in 1930 she was reported to be 28 and working as a typist in a mail order business.  Perhaps she was working at the same place from 1920 through 1930.  In 1925 and 1930 she was living alone with her mother and was single.

Gussie Rosenzweig 1925 NYS census

Gussie Rosenzweig 1925 NYS census

Gussie Rosenzweig 1930 census

Gussie Rosenzweig 1930 census

Like Lizzie, Rachel then disappears.  Her mother died in 1935.  Rachel either had to be living alone or married at the time of the 1940 census, but as with Lizzie, I cannot find a marriage record nor can I find her on the 1940 census living alone.  As with Lizzie, I have nowhere else to turn right now and so have to put this aside and hope some new clue shows up.

This is particularly frustrating since I know that they both lived long enough that Joe’s grandchildren remember them both, but none of them remembers any husbands or children or last names  Perhaps at some point a document or photograph or letter will show up that opens the door to finding out more about Gustave and Gussie’s two youngest children, Lizzie and Ray.

A brick wall

A brick wall (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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5 thoughts on “Women are VERY Difficult: Part III, Lizzie and Rachel

  1. That is frustrating! Obituaries have frequently been my best clue in learning mysterious siblings’ married names and places of residence, but of course some obituaries are much more detailed than others. I hope you’ll turn up some helpful leads one of these days – at least this is good cousin bait!

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  2. Pingback: Mystery solved, Questions Answered!  The Internet Is Magical « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  3. Pingback: A Small Chink in the Wall « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  4. Pingback: Rachel “Ray” Rosenzweig: Can anyone remember anything else? « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

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