The Gift of Photography: Bringing Faces to the Names

I know I just posted yesterday, but I am so excited by the photographs I received last night that I can’t wait to share them.  I have been very fortunate to connect with the family of one of Simon and Rose (Mansbach) Schoenthal’s children, the descendants of their daughter Hettie, whose life story I’ve yet to tell.  The family very generously shared with me a multitude of photographs, and I will share many of them on the blog in upcoming posts.

But some of these photographs are of family members about whom I have already posted.  I’ve added those photographs to the appropriate posts, but since I know it’s unlikely that people will go back to find those photographs, I wanted to share some of them here.  All of the photographs here are courtesy of the family of Ezra Parvin Lippincott, Jr., Hettie Schoenthal Stein’s grandson.

First, here are photographs of Simon Schoenthal and Rose Mansbach, the patriarch and matriarch of this large family:

Rose Mansbach Schoenthal

Rose Mansbach Schoenthal

Simon Schoenthal, my great-great-uncle

Simon Schoenthal, my great-great-uncle

Simon and Rose had ten children; their first two were twins, Harry and Ida.  Ida died when she was a young teenager, so I was very touched to see this photograph of Simon with the twins, taken in 1875 when they were two years old.

Simon Schoenthal with twins Harry and Ida 1875 Courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

Simon Schoenthal with twins Harry and Ida 1875
Courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

And here is a collage of photographs of the nine surviving children: Harry, Gertrude, Louis, Maurice, Martin, Jacob, Hettie, Estelle, and Sidney.  They were my grandmother Eva Schoenthal Cohen’s first cousins.

The nine surviving children of Simon and Rose (Mansbach) Schoenthal Photo courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

The nine surviving children of Simon and Rose (Mansbach) Schoenthal
Photo courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

Looking at all those faces, I cannot help but admire their mother Rose, especially knowing now how close these siblings were to each other.  Here are some additional photographs of Rose Mansbach Schoenthal:

Rose Mansbach Schoenthal courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

Rose Mansbach Schoenthal
courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

Rose Schoenthal -1916

Rose Mansbach Schoenthal 1916

Harry, the oldest surviving child, had a liquor business in Philadelphia for some time before returning to Atlantic City and working in the hotel business there.  I believe this photograph must be related to his Philadelphia business:

Uncle Harry's Beer Business Courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

Uncle Harry’s Beer Businesss
Courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

I am not sure, but perhaps one of those men is Harry himself.

I loved this photograph of Arthur H. Ferrin, who married Juliet Miller, the daughter of Jacob J. and Gertrude (Schoenthal) Miller.  You can tell that Arthur was a Tucson native:

Arthur  H. Ferrin 1905 courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

Arthur H. Ferrin 1905
courtesy of the family of Hettie Schoenthal Stein

There are many more to come, but I didn’t want these to get lost in the shuffle.

 

28 thoughts on “The Gift of Photography: Bringing Faces to the Names

  1. Thank you for ferreting us out and lacing us into your family saga. Countless hours of scanning seem especially worthwhile when more people are able to appreciate the results with photos like these. I’d like to take this opportunity to encourage all your readers to leave some sort of written record of their lives for future generations. Digital files are good, but be sure to print out a copy or two as well on archival quality paper.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Sharon, for sharing the photos, documents, and written memoirs of the Stein and Schoenthal family. You have made all these people very real to me.

      And you’re right about preserving hard copies. I have not been good at that, partly due to laziness, partly due to storage issues. I just don’t have space to keep hard copies of everything and just hope the digital versions will last as long as possible.

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      • Well, I do print out my blog using BlogBooker and Lulu, so I do have a hard copy version of that! But as for all the photographs and documents…. As for new photos, I am one of those crazy nuts who still gets all my photos developed AND put in albums!

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    • I agree. She did have some hard times. Her first daughter died as a teenager in the 1880s, and her husband died in 1904 when she still had children at home. Plus she did go through nine pregnancies!

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  2. Wonderful these have been shared with you. I find distant cousins really appreciate our blogging about the families. It’s give and take – we give them the stories and take all they offer to add to the stories. I like that you shared the photographs you added to previous posts here.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wow! Must be such an experience to see the photos of your ancestors. I don’t have many photos of mine and nobody remembers their stories now. That’s so sad.
    I do rememeber some of the stories that my grand-parents told me as a child, but they are fading.
    Now that I see your ancestors, I’m very sorry for my fading stories…

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t want to be a genealogy nag, but PLEASE write those stories down. You are a writer—preserve those memories for posterity. Some day you won’t remember at all, but if you start writing, you’ll be amazed by how much will come up. PLEASE! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Lake Keowee SC grandparents and grandchild photography | #tbt 2011 » Casual Moments Photography

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