The Brotmanville Brotmans

One of the questions raised early on by several of the Brotman cousins was whether and how we were related to the Brotmans of Brotmanville, NJ.  The history of Brotmanville is quite interesting and something I knew nothing about until I started this project; in fact, I’d never heard of Brotmanville at all.

Brotmanville was established by Abraham Brotman to provide jobs to the Jewish community that had settled in nearby Alliance, New Jersey.  Alliance was founded to be an agricultural community for Jewish immigrants and funded by the Baron de Rothschild.  As The New York Times reported:

In the 1880’s, pogroms and anti-Semitic laws in Russia caused a historic exodus of Jews. Most ended up crowded into tenements in American cities. But some Jewish thinkers urged their brethren, as one of them wrote, “to become tillers of the soil and thus shake off the accusation that we were petty mercenaries living upon the toil of others.” And so hundreds of Jews established agricultural colonies on land bought for them by charities and philanthropists.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/22/nyregion/22colony.html

As Richard Brotman, Abraham Brotman’s great-grandson, reports in a film he made in the 1980s about Brotmanville, the land was difficult to farm, and many people needed an alternative way to earn a living.

Abraham Brotman, himself a recent immigrant from Galicia, had established a successful coat factory in Brooklyn, NY, and decided to relocate it near Alliance to provide jobs for the people who lived there.  Abraham moved with his wife Minnie and their children and his father Moses and his wife and children to southern New Jersey, where eventually a portion of the community was named in his honor.

Many of the Brotmans descended from Moses and/or Abraham Brotman stayed in the southern New Jersey/Philadelphia area, including Judge Stanley Brotman, Rich Brotman’s father, who recently retired from the federal bench at age 89.  In addition, Moses’ granddaughter (through a child of Moses’ second wife), Elaine Ashin, still lives in nearby Vineland.  I spoke with Elaine last week to try and find out more about her grandfather, but unfortunately he died when she was just a few months old so she knew very little about him or his background.

Moses Brotman (photo courtesy of Elaine Ashin)

Image

Bruce and Dennis Brotman remembered meeting with Judge Brotman many years ago and attempting to trace some family connection.  Although they cannot recall finding anything specific, they all left believing that there was some family tie.

Unfortunately, I have yet to find anything that reliably demonstrates that tie.  Moses Brotman was born in Austria in 1847, making him a contemporary of our Joseph Brotman.  Elaine Ashin sent me this photo of Moses’ headstone last week, and I was very excited when I saw it because Moses’ father’s name was Abraham.  I thought perhaps Moses and Joseph were brothers, making us all closely related to the Brotmanville Brotmans.

Photo courtesy of Elaine Ashin

Image

I ordered a copy of Moses’ death certificate from Trenton, NJ, and it arrived the other day.  It confirmed that Moses’ father’s name was Abraham.  However, it listed Moses’ mother’s name as Sadie Bernstein, not Yetta as listed on Joseph’s death certificate.

Image

So I see four possibilities: one, Moses and Joseph are not related at all, but it’s just coincidence that they both had fathers named Abraham Brotman.  Two, either Joseph’s death certificate is wrong as to his mother’s name or Moses’ death certificate is wrong as to his mother’s name, and they are brothers.  Given that we have seen that so many records, even death certificates, have errors (Frieda’s birth year,Hyman’s place of birth, etc.), it certainly is possible that one is wrong, that both are wrong or that both are right.  Three, it could be that Moses and Joseph are half-brothers and that Abraham had two wives and children with both, just as Moses and Joseph both did.  Four, perhaps they are distant cousins sharing a common ancestor named Abraham for whom both their fathers were named.

Unfortunately, we may never know.  In order to learn more, I would need to find documents from Galicia that would trace the history back further.  So far I am still not even sure what town our family came from nor where Moses’ family came from, so that is a difficult task.

So at the moment, the lawyer in me says there is just not enough evidence to conclude with any degree of certainty that we are related in any direct way to the Brotmans of Brotmanville.  But I have not given up, and I will keep looking or find someone in Poland who perhaps can search for me.

19 thoughts on “The Brotmanville Brotmans

    • I thought the same thing, Judy! Those Brotman cheeks!! I am sure there is some connection, but I want a little more to hang it on before I add them “officially” to our family tree. I’d love to do it now—you won’t believe how many children Moses had and how many Abraham had! But I will wait and keep searching.

      Like

  1. Pingback: Looking back on the first six months: Seven lessons learned by doing genealogy « brotmanblog

  2. Pingback: Looking forward: Skiing on the Blue Trails « brotmanblog

  3. Pingback: Brotman Research: Where I am « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  4. Pingback: More Manna from Heaven: Of Bessie, Joseph and the Brotmanville Brotmans « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  5. My name is Carolynn Brotman (Cara) and my family comes from Poland. I wonder if were related. YOu can find me on Facebook. Cara Brotman NOT the one with the picture of the cookie as my profile picture. The other Cara Brotman.

    Like

  6. Pingback: Brotman Update! The Trials and Tribulations of DNA Testing « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  7. Pingback: More in the DNA Wars « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  8. Pingback: My Brotmanville Cousins: Searching for Answers « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  9. Hi Amy – I wonder if you’re aware of a possible Canadian connection here? Brotmans settled in/founded a Jewish Farm Colony at Wapella (denks,Baron de Hirsch) in the then-NorthWest Territories in the early-1880s. One of the earliest settlers to arrive was a Brotman, whose descendants are cousins of mine. Contact Dr. Michael Brotman in Toronto. He lives on Walmer Rd. and he or one of his sisters might have some useful genealogical information.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi David, I knew there were Brotmans who ended up in Canada, but I am not (yet) aware of any connection to my Brotman family. But I will contact you separately for more information! Thanks!!

      Like

  10. You should consider doing a Y-DNA study. Get Rich or one of the other male Brotmans from NJ and a male Brotman from your branch of the tree. If you do a Y-67 test that would give you enough information to see if you are from the same Brotman family as all the male Brotmans would share the same Y-Haplogroup if they came from the same purely paternal lineage. So if Abraham was father to Moses and Joseph you should show up at a genetic distance of 0 with a y-67 comparison.

    Liked by 1 person

    • One of my second cousins has done a Y test. I don’t know if Rich is interested. But on the autosomal tests my Brotman cousins have tested as close cousins to the Brotmanville cousins who have tested. One male descendant has tested—maybe I could ask him to upgrade to a Y also, but frankly, I am content at this point with concluding that Moses and Joseph were brothers. My bigger question is—was Joseph’s wife, my great-grandmother Bessie, his first cousin!?

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s