Wonderful Surprises and Gifts

I had two wonderful surprises this week.  Usually I am hunting down family members, hoping for a response.  Twice this week I heard from relatives who found me.

Lou, a relative by marriage, is a cousin of my cousin Marjorie.  He had visited Marjorie recently and heard about my contact with her.  He sent me two wonderful photographs of Marjorie.  One is posted here: a photograph of Marjorie and her parents, Bessie and Stanley Cohen, at her graduation from Trinity College in Washington, DC, probably around 1947.  I’d never seen a picture of any of these family members before, and it was so meaningful to be able to see Marjorie’s face after spending time getting to know her on the phone this summer.  I hope to be able to meet her in person in the coming months.  I also was excited to see what my great-uncle Stanley looked like and what his wife Bessie looked like.   It really helps to bring these people to life when you can put a face to the name.  Bessie and Stanley look so proud of their daughter, a college graduate back when most women did not even dream of going to college.  (The second photograph I will post when I get to my Seligman relatives as it depicts two of them.)

Bessie and Stanley Cohen with their daughter Marjorie at her graduation

Bessie and Stanley Cohen with their daughter Marjorie at her graduation

The second wonderful surprise came in the form of a comment on the blog from a descendant of Julius and Augusta Selinger, their great-grandson Cito.  He had just accidentally found the blog while searching for something else and was pleased to see and learn more about his family’s history.

He then sent me this wonderful photograph of his great-grandfather Julius’ jewelry store.  Although the photograph is not dated, if you look at it closely, you can read the larger sign in the window that says “Sale…Watches…$4,” and see at the bottom “Price during the War +15.”  I am not exactly sure what that means, but I assume that the reference is to World War I, dating the photograph during the second decade of the 20th century.

Selinger's Jewelry Store 820 F Street, Washington, DC

Selinger’s Jewelry Store 820 F Street, Washington, DC

That makes sense because the young woman to the right standing in the doorway is assumed by the family to be Eleanor Selinger, the daughter of Julius and Augusta who married Henry Abbot and moved to London in 1926.  Eleanor would have been about 22 years old in 1917 when the US entered World War I.  I love being able to see Eleanor’s face also.  She has such a searching, pensive look on her face—what was she thinking?  You can see the reflections of a crowd of people looking into the window as well as some of the buildings across the way.  The store was at 820 F Street in Washington, DC.  Perhaps some of you recognize that location?

Thanks to both Lou and Cito for generously sharing these photographs and for contacting me.  I am so happy that you both were able to find me.  I also received photographs from another family member this week, my cousin Jack, the great-grandson of Joseph Cohen, who was my great-grandfather Emanuel’s older brother.  I will post some of those photographs next week after I have a chance to scan them.

So it’s been a great week to be doing genealogy research.  I am feeling very fortunate for all the gifts that genealogy has provided to me.  Happy Labor Day Weekend, everyone!

 

6 thoughts on “Wonderful Surprises and Gifts

  1. Pingback: 820 F Street: Follow Up « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

  2. Amy, the exquisite storefront photo was taken by Henry French. He donated his entire collection of the National Photo Company to the Library of Congress. Check out photo of him on the Shorpy site.
    http://www.shorpy.com/node/3907

    Title: Selinger front, 820 F, N.W., [Washington, D.C.]
    Date Created/Published: [ca. 1920]
    Medium: 1 negative : glass ; 8 x 6 in.
    Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-npcc-29219 (digital file from original)
    Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
    Call Number: LC-F82- 4412 [P&P]
    Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
    Notes:
    Title from unverified data provided by the National Photo Company on the negative or negative sleeve.
    Date from negatives in same range.
    Gift; Herbert A. French; 1947.
    This glass negative might show streaks and other blemishes resulting from a natural deterioration in the original coatings.
    Temp. note: Batch six.

    Like

  3. Pingback: A wonderful email from a Selinger cousin « Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

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